Head of State

How much power should our Head of State have? Do we even need a Monarchy?

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The Queen is the constitutional monarch. In 2012 she celebrated her Diamond Jubilee marking 60 years on the throne. But as the Head of State what does she actually do? Do we even need her? Over the last 1,000 years power has passed from the monarch who ruled by virtue of the 'Divine Right of Kings' to Parliament. But is there a place for the British monarchy in 2015? Should we have an elected Head of State with far more powers, or in fact merge the Head of State role with that of the Prime Minister?

 

HAVE YOUR SAY... 

We want to hear your views on the role and the powers and duties of the head of state; 

Should the role of Head of State be kept by a British monarch? Should we now have an elected head of state with powers enshrined in the constitution? Should we even have a Head of State at all?

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  1. Ian Smith
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Disestablish the Church and scrap the Monarchy. These two out-dated and un-democratic establishments are un-elected and yet wield great influence in the running of the nation. The monarchy costs the tax-payer huge sums whilst already being the wealthiest in the land - their accounts are not even public! Scrap the monarchy and with it all the aristocrats and hereditary Lords. High time we were a Republic with an elected Head of State - not from the current Establishment.

Carl Dalton
by Carl Dalton
18 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 16
Carl Dalton

In the interest of transition to a republic, Charles Windsor should agree to be a non-executive President/Head of State for a five year term and then to stand against all comers for a second and final five year term as an Elected non-executive President/Head of State

Dane Clouston
by Dane Clouston
17 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 16
Dane Clouston

we need to have a constitutional convention when the Queen dies so that the  people of this country can rid themselves of the idea that we are 'subjects'  if we are to make a future for people we need to state clearly the responsibilities that we have as citizens and we need to state the rights that we have individually and collectively. Currently the theoretical situation exists where the Head of State could with a sympathetic armed service become a dictator.  I don't believe that this...

Moya Russ
by Moya Russ
10 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 6
Moya Russ

The Windsor family (52 members in line to the throne)  can't justify MILLIONS of pounds of public money spent on their palaces, residences, holidays, private jets, private school fees, thousands of security guards, thousands of staff, PR agencies, parties,  etc.. EVERY year! Those millions should go towards improving the NHS and education system for the citizens. The most successful economies in Europe (Germany & France) have abolished monarchy long time ago. Time for England to evolve!

Monik M
by Monik M
20 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 66
Monik M
by
Monik M

A system with an unelected head of state is not a full democracy. Although many of the royals powers have been transferred to the government the head of state is an important job and that person should be voted in by the public and not entitled to it by birthright. Inequality is rightly unacceptable regarding sexism, racism and any other matters yet the royalists have no problem with one family inheriting their positions and excluding every other member of the population. To republicans like...

Adam Welch
by Adam Welch
24 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 8
Adam Welch

I suspect that many ardent republicans will have some respect for our current Queen, who seems to be a hard-working, honest and dedicated worker (albeit very well paid). I favour decapitation of the role of monarchy and all the state-sponsered and empowered trappings of the institution (or "firm") as we know it. Nonetheless, I would be very happy to see Elizabeth Windsor re-apply for her her job should it become vacant and compete for it against other applicants from all walks of life....

Ian Smith
by Ian Smith
5 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 20
Ian Smith

Suggested clause: 'The use of all historic titles used by hereditary heads of state, hereditary rulers and members of the aristocracy of the [UK] and elsewhere in the world is prohibited in public life in the [UK] and all privileges attached to such titles are abolished' Titles such as Dame, Baron, Sir etc, are antiquated and unhelpful as official forms of address in political and public spheres   They will be abolished as forms of address in political and public life (along with the...

Ian Smith
by Ian Smith
14 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 15
Ian Smith

Rid the country of the unelected Monarch and replace with an elected Head of State who runs 5 year terms and has the powers to veto laws passed by Parliament. Terms should start half way between the general elections to Parliament. The elected President should be pushed to be 'above' party politics. They elected President should have no to little powers other than the ability to veto laws passed by Parliament but the veto can be overturned by a referendum by the people, which will...

Matthew Busby
by Matthew Busby
3 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 6
Matthew Busby

There is an important role to play for the head of state.  A new written constitution needs to set out what that role is and ensure that the position is democratically accountable and transparent in the way it works. As things stand our unwritten constitution concentrates considerable power in the hands of the government, with the head of state – the Queen – acting only on the instruction of the prime minister.  This makes the head of state a fairly meaningless role, doing little more than...

Republic
by Republic
248 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 556
Republic

My idea, which I have floated as a comment elsewhere, is that hereditary monarchy (and perhaps any sort of monarchy) sends a very bad message to incumbent dictators and their aspiring offspring that we one of the oldest democracies in the world still subscribe to a basic unfairness that one family can and should be top of the pile

Ian Smith
by Ian Smith
8 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 25
Ian Smith
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