Head of State

How much power should our Head of State have? Do we even need a Monarchy?

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The Queen is the constitutional monarch. In 2012 she celebrated her Diamond Jubilee marking 60 years on the throne. But as the Head of State what does she actually do? Do we even need her? Over the last 1,000 years power has passed from the monarch who ruled by virtue of the 'Divine Right of Kings' to Parliament. But is there a place for the British monarchy in 2015? Should we have an elected Head of State with far more powers, or in fact merge the Head of State role with that of the Prime Minister?

 

HAVE YOUR SAY... 

We want to hear your views on the role and the powers and duties of the head of state; 

Should the role of Head of State be kept by a British monarch? Should we now have an elected head of state with powers enshrined in the constitution? Should we even have a Head of State at all?

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There is an important role to play for the head of state.  A new written constitution needs to set out what that role is and ensure that the position is democratically accountable and transparent in the way it works. As things stand our unwritten constitution concentrates considerable power in the hands of the government, with the head of state – the Queen – acting only on the instruction of the prime minister.  This makes the head of state a fairly meaningless role, doing little more than...

Republic
by Republic
248 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 556
Republic

The Windsor family (52 members in line to the throne)  can't justify MILLIONS of pounds of public money spent on their palaces, residences, holidays, private jets, private school fees, thousands of security guards, thousands of staff, PR agencies, parties,  etc.. EVERY year! Those millions should go towards improving the NHS and education system for the citizens. The most successful economies in Europe (Germany & France) have abolished monarchy long time ago. Time for England to evolve!

Monik M
by Monik M
20 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 66
Monik M
by
Monik M

If we adopt a written constitution and choose to have a head of state then that head should act as a guardian of the UK constitution.   The head should have the right and duty to act if s/he considers that a proposed new statute would infringe the constitution.  In that case s/he should either: 1. Have the power to send the bill back to parliament for reconsideration; and/or 2. Send it to the Supreme Court for consideration of the potential infringement. 

Ian Smith
by Ian Smith
13 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 19
Ian Smith

The way I see it, there are three models for an elected president; the American, Irish and French. Comparing a Country to a company, with the American model the Chairman (ie the pres) is also the Chief Executive. With the Irish Model, the Chair and the Chief Executive (the Taoiseach, or PM) are totally separate. All meaningful power is executed by the PM. The French model is a bit of a  mélange, with some powers executed by the Pres and some by the PM. on balance, I prefer the Irish model....

Hugo Read
by Hugo Read
6 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 7
Hugo Read

In the interest of transition to a republic, Charles Windsor should agree to be a non-executive President/Head of State for a five year term and then to stand against all comers for a second and final five year term as an Elected non-executive President/Head of State

Dane Clouston
by Dane Clouston
17 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 16
Dane Clouston

Rid the country of the unelected Monarch and replace with an elected Head of State who runs 5 year terms and has the powers to veto laws passed by Parliament. Terms should start half way between the general elections to Parliament. The elected President should be pushed to be 'above' party politics. They elected President should have no to little powers other than the ability to veto laws passed by Parliament but the veto can be overturned by a referendum by the people, which will...

Matthew Busby
by Matthew Busby
3 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 6
Matthew Busby

A democratic constitution will have to revise existing oaths of allegiance. Those elected to parliament must swear to serve their constituents and uphold the democratic constitution. Those serving in armed forces must pledge allegiance to parliament and defend the democratic constitution.

James Doran
by James Doran
36 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 24
James Doran

what we need is an elected head of state, as for what type that should be decided by the populace through a referendum with two choices an executive presidency or a ceremonial presidency, the former royal family would be allowed the right to vote and stand for election if they wish, the lords would be replaced by a regionally elected legislature, the house of commons also needs to be remodelled on the modern horsehoe design. we also need a freedom of information act with a 30yr benchmark for...

Mark Jones
by Mark Jones
20 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 14
Mark Jones

Abolish privilege Equality for all All citizens of 16 years and older to have the right to vote, right to stand as a member of Parliament, right to stand as Head of State. And have all these rights written down, for all to see.

Alan Green
by Alan Green
4 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 12
Alan Green

Disestablish the Church and scrap the Monarchy. These two out-dated and un-democratic establishments are un-elected and yet wield great influence in the running of the nation. The monarchy costs the tax-payer huge sums whilst already being the wealthiest in the land - their accounts are not even public! Scrap the monarchy and with it all the aristocrats and hereditary Lords. High time we were a Republic with an elected Head of State - not from the current Establishment.

Carl Dalton
by Carl Dalton
18 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 16
Carl Dalton
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