The Government

In the absence of a UK constitution, is today’s government just too powerful?

56
753
910
139

As the head of the government the Prime Minister has immense power. Since the first Prime minister Sir Robert Walpole took this office, 52 Prime Ministers have been and gone. Since then, naturally the role and powers of the Prime Minister has drastically changed. In modern day Britain, what should the constitution say about the role and powers of the Prime Minister and his government? In the absence of a codified UK constitution, is today’s government just too powerful?


HAVE YOUR SAY...

If a political party wins a majority and becomes the government should they and the Prime minister be bound by the manifesto pledges we elected them on

Should we have more of a say on where our taxes are spent?

Has the coalition agreement changed the powers of the government? What should be the role of the Deputy Prime Minister? – Has Nick Clegg had too much influence over the past 5 years?

More >

Hacking the Content
Refining the Content
Preparation
Constitutional Convention
Our new Constitution

Filters

Tags

Tags

View More

Status Labels

Status Labels

Top Contributors

  1. John Z
    2845 pts
  2. Ian Smith
    2686 pts
  3. Scott Wilson
    1176 pts
  4. James Doran
    1165 pts
  5. Tom Austin
    1160 pts

View leaderboard

Sort by

Because politicians tend to be out of touch with the average person with politicians having their own agenda, I would put in the Constitution a concept called "initiative and referendum", in which if a specified number of adult persons sign/e-sign a petition on an issue, then that issue is placed on the ballot for vote (most likely on Election Day).  If that public vote obtains a specified percent of the total vote, then that issue will become law. This is different from the current...

John Z
by John Z
10 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 57
John Z
by
John Z

The constitution should enshrine the responsibility of the government to use rigourously established objective evidence in its policy making.  All too often (all of the time?) policy is based upon ideology, attempting to increase popularity ratings, point scoring against rival parties, or pure self-interest. What the country deserves is policy based on objective evidence, as below: Test the theory as to why the policy will be effective and what the impacts of the policy will be if it is...

Tom Peach-Geraghty
by Tom Peach-Geraghty
7 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 34
Tom Peach-Geraghty

No individual should be permitted to be Prime Minister for more than 2 terms of Parliament 

Ian Smith
by Ian Smith
10 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 21
Ian Smith

This proposal may sound obvious, but nothing should be taken for granted.  Basically, when the Constitution is finalized, the government shall publish (and thereafter annually publish) the text of the Constitution ALONG WITH citations to supporting statutes, case law, principles, Royal Prerogative, Conventions, International Law, etc... that currently support each provision.  For any new principles that are not presently supported by any citation, then the publication should state that....

John Z
by John Z
10 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 45
John Z
by
John Z

  "In fulfillment of the principle that the sole legitimate source of political power is the people, all levels of government are required to respect the principle of subsidiarity. The lowest level of government (including local and parish councils) reasonably capable of exercising any given responsibility should be entitled to do so if that is the clearly expressed choice of its voters." This clause is derived from the original idea below and from the comments made in the second phase....

Alastair Bruton
by Alastair Bruton
7 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 13
Alastair Bruton

Firstly, ideally all citizens must submit to the constitution from its inception. This must include the monarchy, the executive, parliament, devolved administrations, local government, the judiciary, the police, HMRC, .... And lastly but certainly not 'least' the individual citizen.  As to issues relating to individual party manifestos, maybe the idea of a more 'defined' constitution might give cause for thought as to the compilation declared manifestos as the politicians would have...

Gavin Russ
by Gavin Russ
5 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 11
Gavin Russ

The governance of the Bank of England should be outlined in the constitution, along with rules concerning the issuing of currency.

James Doran
by James Doran
9 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 17
James Doran

The state should be divorced from religion. As we know all religions don't believe in equal rights for women and many repressed minorities. Therefore, why do we continue to let religion have such a powerful say in how our country is run? Why are there 26 non-elected male Bishops in the House of Lords? Why are faith schools being supported by taxpayers money? Why is gender segregation being allowed in publically funded places like the LSE and many other university student unions? We should...

Hilary Baxter
by Hilary Baxter
23 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 21
Hilary Baxter

All new pieces of legislation (including budgets) should be put out to public consultation, as currently happens in Scotland, as well as being put before panels of experts and citizens juries which would come up with proposals which must be considered before the legislation is put into force

Ben King-Beck
by Ben King-Beck
2 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 18
Ben King-Beck

I have a feeling but I wish push the limits. Maybe it should be in Parliament's remit to ratify the appointments but not based upon a simple party majority or coalition. Might not a cutoff point say two thirds of ALL MP's would have to vote for the candidate before final ratification?  And ... Might the citizens choose between the party leaders during the general voting system who they feel might represent them? This might be attached to the general ballot and might act as a powerful guide...

Gavin Russ
by Gavin Russ
3 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 17
Gavin Russ
Load more
Share