The Government

In the absence of a UK constitution, is today’s government just too powerful?

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As the head of the government the Prime Minister has immense power. Since the first Prime minister Sir Robert Walpole took this office, 52 Prime Ministers have been and gone. Since then, naturally the role and powers of the Prime Minister has drastically changed. In modern day Britain, what should the constitution say about the role and powers of the Prime Minister and his government? In the absence of a codified UK constitution, is today’s government just too powerful?


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If a political party wins a majority and becomes the government should they and the Prime minister be bound by the manifesto pledges we elected them on

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Suggested clause for the constitution: ' The duties and responsibilities of the Prime Minister and their Cabinet shall be discharged by those individuals alone with the assistance of neutral civil service advisors.' Idea behind the draft clause: We elect MPs to govern us and pay for a neutral civil service to support them and implement their governments' decisions.  What we do not elect are special advisers.  So why is that that we have ended up with an army of  unelcted special...

Ian Smith
by Ian Smith
7 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 16
Ian Smith

The absence of a constitution that defines what 'national resources'  can be used for, has lead to creeping change over the last few decades, where North Sea oil wealth has been squandered by successive governments, infrastructure assets have been sold off to global companies and large swathes of our city properties are being snapped up by Russians, Chinese and other non-UK millionaires looking for somewhere safer to park their wealth. I am not anti-business and have spent most of my...

steveg33
by steveg33
10 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 28
steveg33

I have a feeling but I wish push the limits. Maybe it should be in Parliament's remit to ratify the appointments but not based upon a simple party majority or coalition. Might not a cutoff point say two thirds of ALL MP's would have to vote for the candidate before final ratification?  And ... Might the citizens choose between the party leaders during the general voting system who they feel might represent them? This might be attached to the general ballot and might act as a powerful guide...

Gavin Russ
by Gavin Russ
3 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 17
Gavin Russ

All new pieces of legislation (including budgets) should be put out to public consultation, as currently happens in Scotland, as well as being put before panels of experts and citizens juries which would come up with proposals which must be considered before the legislation is put into force

Ben King-Beck
by Ben King-Beck
2 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 18
Ben King-Beck

The governance of the Bank of England should be outlined in the constitution, along with rules concerning the issuing of currency.

James Doran
by James Doran
9 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 17
James Doran

  "In fulfillment of the principle that the sole legitimate source of political power is the people, all levels of government are required to respect the principle of subsidiarity. The lowest level of government (including local and parish councils) reasonably capable of exercising any given responsibility should be entitled to do so if that is the clearly expressed choice of its voters." This clause is derived from the original idea below and from the comments made in the second phase....

Alastair Bruton
by Alastair Bruton
7 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 13
Alastair Bruton

After reading  degauntier's  thread on the limits of military activity, I think the issue of emergency powers of the executive should be painted with a broader brush, that is, a constitution should define the government's powers and circumscription of those powers during times of emergency, to prevent abuse or contravention of human rights. Generally, it must furthermore address the question of how independently a government, or even the head of state, may act in times of national security....

Ramon James
by Ramon James
8 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 18
Ramon James

Phase 2 version (draft 2 amendments in bold): Government fiscal accounting shall be based on an 'official unit of account' whose value may not be either a) arbitrary or b) controlled, wholly or in part, directly or indirectly, by private interests or by agencies outside Britain. Minutes or hours of passive labour shall be regarded as an acceptable official unit of account . This provision shall not constrain the continued use of an established non-qualifying unit of account during a...

Malcolm Ramsay
by Malcolm Ramsay
1 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 17
Malcolm Ramsay

Suggested clause for constitution: 'Members of the Government must carry out their duties in a manner which is honest and trustworthy'   Idea behind the draft clause: Time and time again the public ask for honesty and trustworthiness from politicians and over and over politicians let us down.  The constitution should state that these are core qualities and that all members of the government must carry out their duties in s manner which is honest and trustworthy.

Ian Smith
by Ian Smith
5 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 14
Ian Smith

Suggested clause (drafted by Andrew Bulovsky) 'The manifestos that parties make in the run-up to a General Election must be considered a commitment to the public as the actual goals and priorities of a Government. As such, manifestos shall be binding upon a Government.  Should a Government be formed by two or more parties, it is expected that they shall reconcile differences through negotiations, and are still responsible to the public for finding a common ground on policies that are as...

Ian Smith
by Ian Smith
4 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 19
Ian Smith
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