Elections

What should the constitution say about how we elect our representatives?

58
980
928
181

With the 2015 General Election a few months away what should the constitution say about how we elect our representatives?

The First Past the Post system by which we elect our MPs requires MPs to win a majority of votes regardless of the number of people who turned up to vote. It makes it possible for an election to be decided on a few 'marginal seats' (constituencies where the current MPs' majority is small). Is this a fair way to decide the government? Is it even worth voting? What about the other representatives that we could vote for? What about Councillors, Mayors, police and crime commissioners and members of the European Parliament? What voting systems do we use to elect them and are they any better?

More >

Hacking the Content
Refining the Content
Preparation
Constitutional Convention
Our new Constitution

Filters

Tags

Tags

View More

Status Labels

Status Labels

Top Contributors

  1. John Z
    3790 pts
  2. James Grindrod
    1155 pts
  3. Nicholas Charalambides
    1115 pts
  4. Daniel Gaunt
    1051 pts
  5. Ian Smith
    1045 pts

View leaderboard

Sort by

The constitution should stipulate that the election of representatives must be conducted on the basis of "one member, one vote".

James Doran
by James Doran
1 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 8
James Doran

Elections are the foundation of our democracy. A constitution should enshrine the principle of free and fair elections, ensuring that everyone has the right to participate (directly or indirectly), to vote, to stand as a candidate and to put forward their political views. But fair elections should also entail that everyone’s voice is heard, and that their votes translate directly into electoral outcomes. The current political system is under strain. Fewer citizens are turning out to vote,...

The Electoral Reform Society
58 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 125
The Electoral Reform Society

As a co-facilitator along with Nicholas, I am curious as to what peoples' views are on lowering the voting age to 16. As we've posted on the Storify page for Elections, Scotland has recently decided to extend the vote to 16 and 17 year olds. What do you think about extending the British vote to 16 and 17 year olds?

Lila Kelso
by Lila Kelso
14 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 40
Lila Kelso

Empowering constituents to initiate a "total" recall mechanism for all elected politicians  

BananaPlant
by BananaPlant
6 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 14
BananaPlant

Regular elections are important, but what happens if we end up with more (or less!) than we bargained for? We have never had the ability to select for or against parts of a governing party's policy programme, even at election time - most elections are won on a relatively small number of key issues. As it stands, we don't account for policy preferences or allow for the most basic democratic oversight - that of citizens themselves. I would suggest three new powers for the electorate which...

John Hackett
by John Hackett
18 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 56
John Hackett

A UK Constitution should grant the right to vote in general election to those resident in the UK for 5 years or more.  Currently, non-Brits cannot vote in national elections (despite that they are already allowed to vote in local elections) until obtaining British nationality, which they can apply for after having lived in the UK for at least five years. If all UK-residents of over five years are allowed to vote, everyone will be able to have their say in the future of the country they have...

Yona Lesger
by Yona Lesger
2 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 29
Yona Lesger

We should enshrine an end to our current system in which a small number of wavering voters get to decide the outcome of  a small number of wavering seats which then determine the outcome of a general election 

Ian Smith
by Ian Smith
6 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 15
Ian Smith

Suggested clause: 'Parliament's term shall be of a fixed length with elections held in the same week of the year every 4 years.'  (There will need to be some final refinement to enable earlier dissolution of a parliament on the basis that no effective government may be formed) Parliament terms should be of a fixed length of either 4 or 5 years and the dates and voting times of general elections should be fixed according to a formula that ensures that they cannot be manipulated by...

Ian Smith
by Ian Smith
6 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 23
Ian Smith

We are a mature society in the 21st century and therefore should extend universal suffrage to prisoners. If we see the penal system as rehabilitative rather than punitive we should afford those convicted of a crime the opportunity to engage in society as reintegrated citizens of that society within the constitution. By withholding the vote we are silencing them, and sending a clear signal that they are not part of mainstream society, their opinion is not valued and their voices unheard.

James Smith
by James Smith
9 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 36
James Smith

Currently, only the votes of a few citizens decide the outcome of general and local elections. The outcome of these elections bears little relation to the choices expressed through the ballot box. Our citizens are effectively disenfranchised on a vast scale, and the power that one citizen has to affect the outcome of an election varies widely from another. Even where proportional representation is used, it delivers inconsistent and disproportionate results.  Therefore, if we are to...

James Grindrod
by James Grindrod
27 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 13
James Grindrod
Share