Rights and Duties

Is it high time the UK had a bill of rights like the US?

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Should the constitution specify the duties of a citizen? Should any of these duties be enforced and how? Is it high time the UK had a bill of rights like the US? If we were to leave the European Union which of your rights would you want to be protected?

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The UK should be a secular republic where no religion, cult or creed should receive any official recognition from the state. No religious imagery should be shown in any building or institution receiving even one penny of state funding. No religion should receive charitable tax relief. 

LessGrumpy
by LessGrumpy
19 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 8
LessGrumpy

Second revision: First revision: Rights that in the future will be considered fundamental to democracy, but are unknown due to 1. the problem hasn't arised that demonastrates the need for the right, or 2. society hasn't reached the requisite circumstances in which that right is revealed, i.e. The right to uncensored Internet could only be known after the Internet was created and was beginning to be used, will be protected with a clause which states "Any rights deemed fundamental to a...

Trevyn Case
by Trevyn Case
8 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 30
Trevyn Case

Enlightenment Values, not ‘British’ Values Whilst there are many values to be drawn from the Enlightenment there is no consensus in favour of the many principles born during the Enlightenment. Some of these principles divide along ideological lines too plainly and can cause conflict where conflict is unnecessary; therefore I have selected ideas and principles that the plurality of people can agree on regardless of your particular ideology or school of thought. This will be a necessary...

Kristopher Cussans
by Kristopher Cussans
4 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 7
Kristopher Cussans

Suggested constitution clause: 'Everyone has the right to be presumed innocent unless and until proved guilty of a crime by a court of law.  That right shall extend beyond the concluded trial of an acquitted person and the state cannot cast doubt on any acquittal.' The presumption of innocence until proven guilty is usually consdidered to be a fair trial right.  It has however, rightly in my view, been extended by the European Court of Human Rights to cover events which follow an...

Ian Smith
by Ian Smith
10 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 5
Ian Smith

Suggested clause: 'All rights accorded to persons by this constitution are actionable before the courts and compensation shall be payable to any injured person where he or she has suffered injury or damage.' Idea behind the clause: The constitution should declare that all of the rights contained in the constitution should be actionable in the Courts. This would ensure that even if a capricious parliament were to repeal some statute of real importance (for example a statute...

Ian Smith
by Ian Smith
15 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 6
Ian Smith

  Proposal: The rights set out in this constitution shall apply to all human persons from birth until death, but not to corporate bodies of any kind. If this provision is not included, then big corporations will claim all the same rights as people, whether appropriate or not, on the grounds that they are "persons", which for some, but not all, legal purposes they are. This argument is widely used in USA to distort the meaning of their constitution in their favour (e.g. the right to...

JimF
by JimF
5 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 7
JimF
by
JimF

Suggested constitution clause: 'Every individual is free to have no religion and to express non-religious ideas.  No individual shall be discriminated against in law by reason of having no religion or expressing non-religious ideas.' (And this shall either be a stand-alone clause or built into equality and freedom of thought and expression clauses.  The LSE team can no doubt make the final decision on that.  I suggest that any further comments and votes simply consider the merits of...

Ian Smith
by Ian Smith
21 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 26
Ian Smith

Peaceful political protest is recognised as the right of every citizen and as a legitimate part of the democratic process. The state at every level is required to facilitate such protest. The right to protest may be exercised in any public place or in any private space generally open to the public and serving a similar purpose to that of a public street or square during the time when the  space is usually open to the public....

Alastair Bruton
by Alastair Bruton
7 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 22
Alastair Bruton

In addition to the right to freedom which I have described in a previous proposal (General Right to Freedom), there are other basic rights of every person, regardless of status or financial means, which the government of the day should be required to ensure are met: Clean air Clean water in sufficient quantity for drinking, cooking and basic cleanliness Adequate wholesome food Shelter Sanitation Adequate protective clothing Basic health care & basic social care for the disabled Access...

JimF
by JimF
2 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 30
JimF
by
JimF

  Draft-2, [ all amendments in 'bold' ] Now Draft 2b! i-Every child born within the Jurisdiction of the UK Constitution shall be considered to possess the status of Citizen, should the Parent or Legal- guardian of the child deny them this the child upon reaching 'majority' can seek to regain this status and regain this status without let or hindrance. ii-Every child shall from birth be accorded all the rights pertaining to an adult Citizen save where the Law sets limits (as to...

Tom Austin
by Tom Austin
3 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 24
Tom Austin
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