Rights and Duties

Is it high time the UK had a bill of rights like the US?

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Should the constitution specify the duties of a citizen? Should any of these duties be enforced and how? Is it high time the UK had a bill of rights like the US? If we were to leave the European Union which of your rights would you want to be protected?

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At the Prisoners’ Advice Service (PAS) we believe a meaningful commitment to access to the legal process should be enshrined in any codified constitution introduced in Britain. Access to a legal remedy is a fundamental principle of the rule of law and we see first-hand how important it is for prisoners to receive legal advice and representation for them to be able to defend their rights. However, following repeated rounds of swingeing legal aid cuts introduced first by the outgoing Labour...

Prisoners' Advice Service
by Prisoners' Advice Service
23 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 7
Prisoners' Advice Service

"The Government or any government agency may not seize private property for public use without just compensation." The term "just compensation" is no doubt vague, but it will up to the parties involved to determine what is "just compensation", and if an agreement cannot be reached, then the matter no doubt will be decided by the Judiciary.

John Z
by John Z
5 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 35
John Z
by
John Z

I suggest a preamble to the constitution  stating: 'Rights and duties are interdependent and the people of the UK understand that in many cases their rights under this constitution come at a cost and carry with them responsibilities to the other people of the [UK].' ' The reasoning behind this is: It is much harder and complicated to talk about and indeed set out our responsibilities to each other.  We must do that too. It is hard to think of any right which does not come at some...

Ian Smith
by Ian Smith
2 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 10
Ian Smith

Many of the debates highlight very interesting questions about the very nature of rights.   My point here, which I hope will lead to useful discussion in one place, is that ... Rights are not rights until we declare them to be so ... because there are no such things as incontrovertible rights only interests which various people and governments have characterised as "fundamental" or "absolute" rights

Ian Smith
by Ian Smith
1 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 15
Ian Smith

Protection of morality has been the claimed motivation behind a variety of state interferences in the lives of ordinary people but morality and morals are not well-defined universally accepted concepts. Christians define morality in a particular way, Muslims in another, Atheists in another, Humanists in another and so on. The constitution should forbid parliament and other trappings of the state from any attempt to define or enforce any aspect of morality leaving such matters entirely to...

Bob Stammers
by Bob Stammers
9 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 23
Bob Stammers

Final proposal:   ' individuals shall have the right to privacy and the right to communicate without interception.' The concept of privacy, both offline and online, and the ability to communicate privately and without interception by government agencies is slowly being degraded in favour of blanket surveillance. Our right to communicate with friends, family, business colleagues or contacts, or strangers for that matter, via email, text, instant message, telephone, skype, social...

Tom Peach-Geraghty
by Tom Peach-Geraghty
35 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 11
Tom Peach-Geraghty

Proposal: ' No one may be subject to any kind of punishment by any organ of government unless and until they have been found guilty in a properly constituted court of breaking the law' The bill of rights should include a provision that no one may be subject to any kind of punishment by any organ of government unless and until they have been found guilty in a properly constituted court of breaking the law. This would mean the end of various punishments and restrictions introduced by recent...

JimF
by JimF
19 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 14
JimF
by
JimF

In addition to the right to freedom which I have described in a previous proposal (General Right to Freedom), there are other basic rights of every person, regardless of status or financial means, which the government of the day should be required to ensure are met: Clean air Clean water in sufficient quantity for drinking, cooking and basic cleanliness Adequate wholesome food Shelter Sanitation Adequate protective clothing Basic health care & basic social care for the disabled Access...

JimF
by JimF
2 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 30
JimF
by
JimF

Suggested constitution clause (in the criminal justice section): '- Nobody should be compelled to testify against themselves; - Confessions obtained under duress are inadmissible in courts of law; - Nobody should be convicted solely upon their own confession.'

Ian Smith
by Ian Smith
13 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 6
Ian Smith

  1 The State shall allocate funds for insurance-like services, paid-for in taxes and claimed-back as a right at other times in the citizen's life. The state shall account for the funds, predict future benefits, and not divert these funds to circuses or foreign wars or any other purpose. A commitment to the concept of a fund will serve until a real fund or funds are established.   2 The State shall co-operate with other similar social insurance systems around the world, and...

John Robertson
by John Robertson
1 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 11
John Robertson
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