Devolution

Should more power be given away?

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Devolution is the transfer of powers from the UK Parliament in Westminster to the Welsh and Northern Irish assemblies in Cardiff and Belfast, and the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh. In 1998, Parliament passed 3 devolution Acts of Parliament: the Scotland Act 1998; the Northern Ireland Act 1998; and the Government of Wales Act 1998, all of which made significant changes to the UK’s uncodified constitution. It was decided after the recent Scottish referendum that more powers are to be devolved. What does this mean for the UK Parliament? There is much debate surrounding the English question – Should MPs with seats in Scotland, Northern Ireland or Wales continue to be allowed to vote on legislation and other matters in the UK Parliament in Westminster that will only affect people in England?

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  1. Michael Ward
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  2. Harry Blain
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Devolution of government from it's current London base will always be lop-sided while Parliament resides in our main commercial city. The further people are from London, the more disenfranchised they feel. London has its own identity and needs as our only truly global city. Many countries have recognised the need for this separation ( USA, Canada, Australia, The Netherlands etc). The emergence of a 'London Metropolitan Elite' during this century has been a primary cause of the feeling that...

steveg33
by steveg33
4 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 43
steveg33

Great Britain or Britian needs some adjustment in terms of how various groups within this country feel about this 'united kingdom' . Devolution has presented problems in relation to devolved powers and the confusion caused by partial devolution of powers that the devolved administrations in Scotland, Wales & Northern Ireland have and are experiencing.  I would stress that 'confederation' stresses union , created by treaty, dealing with issues relating to the 'commonwealth' of all members...

Gavin Russ
by Gavin Russ
2 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 10
Gavin Russ

The regions of England have legitimate historic identities, some with their own ancient languages and customs, others with dialects still in common use. These identities will not be preserved or protected without recognition, and the idea of a unitary England is what prevents that recognition. I'll start by declaring that I've been pretty open about being in favour of regional devolution, but I've seen enough conflict over the subject of England in the context of devolution that it seems...

John Hackett
by John Hackett
9 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 18
John Hackett

The 1707 act of Union is dead in all but name.  Significantly it stated that here should be one UK government to represent the UK.  Now we have three, in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.  Ministers from these institutions can, and have, represented the whole of the UK in the EU. In addition that Act stated that all parts of the Union should have equal opportunities and benefits.  Clearly that is no longer the case with free or subsidised tertiary education everywhere in the UK except...

Priscilla Cullen
by Priscilla Cullen
11 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 48
Priscilla Cullen

Suggested clause: -  All enactments in the [UK] must, as far as possible be in the same format and use the same language and legal terminology; and - The Courts of the [UK] must, as far as possible, use the same language and legal terminology.' Idea behind the clause: Legilslation in the UK is in many cases created on a "reserved" basis meaning that the statute in question is akin to a "federal" law to be applied throughout the UK.  An example would be the Companies Acts....

Ian Smith
by Ian Smith
7 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 9
Ian Smith

I believe the only sensible solution to the political quandary over devolution and 'English votes for English laws' is to make the UK a federation. A written constitution would determine what was the sole prerogative of the UK parliament (at least foreign policy and defence), all other matters falling to the English, Scottish, Welsh and Northern Irish assemblies. I would like to see an English assembly and administration based somewhere other than London, preferably in the north. The House...

Charles Williams
by Charles Williams
2 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 9
Charles Williams

The position of Scotland and England within the current Union is constitutionally very different from the position of Wales and Northern Ireland which, like England, come under the thrall of the English Crown, constitutional practices and law but are constitutionally and legally territories of the English Crown. Scotland retains its own crowned head, law and constitutional practice protected under article 19 of the Treaty of Union 1707 for 'all time' where for all time means exactly that,...

Peter Thomson
by Peter Thomson
4 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 10
Peter Thomson

Devo max or federalism of some kind is probably inevitable but our new constitution should enshrine the principal that  executive decisions should not be duplicated  by this I mean that we shoulld avoid multiple layers of expensive decision making but multiple legislatures 

Ian Smith
by Ian Smith
5 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 5
Ian Smith

It sounds like a fundamentally simple thing to say, but devolution  needs to come from the grass roots up. We've seen during the course of the coalition government, various devolution packages here and there but the whole system is fundamentally flawed as central government has decided which areas should get devolution and what they should get.  Here in Cornwall there is a clear appetite for devolution and an apparent unwillingness for central government to address these issues. Despite,...

cernyw
by cernyw
5 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 16
cernyw
by
cernyw

It's the last week of the first phase of the project and thanks everyone for your contributions so far. The devolution debate in the UK is often hindered by differing interpretations of the main underlying principle of devolving power. Mainly, is the principle of devolution about bringing more power and decision making to a local level or is it about reinforcing the national or sub-national identities within the UK? A big aspect of this debate is whether England should be regionalised or...

Michael Ward
by Michael Ward
4 Votes
Voting closed
Comments 8
Michael Ward
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