Campaigns to be Funded by "We the People"

The central theme of a UK Constitution should be "We the People", not "We the Corporations" nor "We the Labour Unions" nor "We the Bankers".  Moreover, it is only "We the People" who vote in elections, not "We the Corporations, Labour Unions, etc..."  Additionally, many global corporations barely pay taxes in the UK, despite earning huge profits in the UK.  As such, campaign funding should be limited to UK residents in their own individual capacity (and not in their capacity as President of a Bank, CEO of a corporation, etc...), AND from taxpayer money.  (Of course individual contributions would also have a cap set by Parliament).

As the old saying goes, "money talks", so why should these non-person non-voting entities have a bigger say than the average person?   They shouldn't!

edited on Feb 15, 2015 by Nicholas Charalambides

Nicholas Charalambides Apr 5, 2015

Now we are into phase two, and so we can consolidate discussion on this topic, could we keep all commentary on the related idea in Alastair Bruton's post on taxpayer funding of elections: https://constitutionuk.com/category/2844#/post/98906

Many Thanks!

John Z Apr 5, 2015

They are not the same ideas.  This current proposal is limited to people who voluntarily choose to contribute to a specific cause, and for those who do not want to contribute do not.  The link of the proposal that Nicholas states is for public money/taxpayer money to fund the elections, thus every person's money is being used.   

Nicholas Charalambides Apr 5, 2015

The preference is for all discussion on the funding of politics, be it campaigns or parties themselves, to be conflated, so we can see where the general opinion lies on all the matters that this topic entails, including the specific one you have raised in your proposal.

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John Z Apr 17, 2015

How is this:

"Political and campaign contributions shall only made by people in their individual capacity.  The amount that can be contributed shall be capped by an act of Parliament". 

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